Universal Access To All Knowledge
Home Donate | Store | Blog | FAQ | Jobs | Volunteer Positions | Contact | Bios | Forums | Projects | Terms, Privacy, & Copyright
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload

Reply to this post | See parent post | Go Back
View Post [edit]

Poster: skuzzlebutt Date: May 21, 2011 5:46am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Songs that improved with age

Depends on what you mean by "age". If you mean tunes that got better over just their first few years, then I think quite a number of songs fit that description. "Playin'", "Truckin'", etc. But if by "age" you mean "better in the 80s or 90s than in the 60s or 70s" then the list shrinks substantially for me. I would agree with "Deal" and "Cassidy", maybe a couple of other shorter songs. Some of the "Bird Songs" of the early Brent years are quite strong. But most Dead songs seemed to follow a natural arc of peaking after 2-4 years, remaining there for a while, then gradually sloping off. "Eyes" is one I think of as being about as good in its first year or so as it would ever be.

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: billydlions Date: May 21, 2011 6:44am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Songs that improved with age

Jack Straw, Sugaree, Brown Eyed Women, Big RR & Deal were great in the early 80's. I like Uncle John's Band better in the 80's too. Some songs like Cumberland and Birdsong were great in both the 70's and 80's. I know I'm in the minority here by liking the St Stephens from 76-78 better than the older versions (not that I dislike them). I also like the Dew's best starting in 73-74 and in to the 80's.

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: TOOTMO Date: May 23, 2011 2:32pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Songs that improved with age

"I also like the Dew's best starting in 73-74 and in to the 80's."

BDL, I would agree to an extent but then I crank this up (or my cell phone rings) and I am swayed back to the primal.

http://www.archive.org/details/gd1967-10-22.sbd.yerys.1525.shnf

It's all good,
TOOTMO

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)